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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) found in the catalog.

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae)

Mercedes D. Delfinado

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae)

by Mercedes D. Delfinado

  • 346 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Chicago Natural History Museum in [Chicago] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Philippines.
    • Subjects:
    • Culicoides -- Philippines.,
    • Ceratopogonidae -- Philippines.

    • Edition Notes

      SeriesChicago Natural History Museum. Publication, 920, Fieldiana: zoology,, v. 33, no. 7, Publication (Chicago Natural History Museum) ;, 920., Fieldiana., v. 33, no. 7.
      ContributionsPhilippine Zoological Expedition (1946-1947)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL1 .F4 vol. 33, no. 7
      The Physical Object
      Pagination629-675 p.
      Number of Pages675
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5824194M
      LC Control Number61011184
      OCLC/WorldCa4481730

      Culicoides are small flies in the family Ceratopogonidae. In North America, they are commonly referred to as biting midges, no-see-ums, or punkies. The genus is the most diverse genus of the family Ceratopogonidae, with more than 20% of the species in the family (Borkent a). They are cosmopolitan in distribution occurring on everyCited by: 3. The Ceratopogonidae as a whole is a family of small nematocerous flies, 2–4 mm in length with a wingspan of usually less than 2 mm. Although closely related to the non-biting midges, or Chironomidae, they are easily distinguished by the female's biting mouthparts, their short fore legs and characteristic venation on their membranous wings.

      Overview Top of page Context and history. Culicoides species (biting midges) can, depending on their geographical location, also be called ‘sandflies’ (not to be confused with the phlebotomine sandflies), ‘punkies’, ‘no-see-ums’, 'no-nos’, ‘moose-flies’ or ‘biting gnats’ (Boorman, ).There are more than named species of Culicoides and approximately 50 have been. Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon by: 7.

      More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety Cited by: Blood-sucking midges of the genus Culicoides are found throughout the world, about species having so far been described (Arnaud & Wirth, ). They are commonly known as "biting midges" in most parts of the world and as "sand-flies" in the central Americas and the U.S.A.


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The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) by Mercedes D. Delfinado Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) by Delfinado, Mercedes DPages: Title.

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Title Variants: Alternative: Philippine Zoological Expedition, Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides from Panama (Diptera: Heleidae) [Wirth, Willis W.

and Blanton, Francis S.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides from Panama (Diptera: Heleidae)Author: Francis S. Wirth, Willis W. and Blanton. Genre/Form: book: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Delfinado, Mercedes D. (Mercedes Delfino), Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae).

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Delfinado, Mercedes D. (Mercedes Delfino), Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae). Culicoides (Oecacta) palawanensis, new species The pale wing markings follow those of cordiger, but this species differs from cordiger in the absence of black, stigmatic spots on DELFINADO: PHILIPPINE BITING MIDGES the second radial cell, the distal half of the first, and the middle of cell R 5.

biting midges were sent by Dr. Szent-Ivany, Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries, Port Moresby, New Guinea and Mr. Smee, Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station, Keravat, New Britain.

In the previous paper 30 species of the genus Culicoides were listed, with descriptions of 25 species. This paper corrects and supplements the. The biting midgets are tiny.

At only mm long, the gray midges (Ceratopogonidae) are the smallest blood-sucking midges. The most troublesome belong to the genus Culicoides, which includes more than species and can be found in most parts of the globe.

Most species of the Culicoides have wings with dark and light spots. Officially, they are biting midges. Even more officially, they are of the genus Culicoides, which I believe is Latin for nasty little boogers that irritate the hell out of you.

The highland midge (scientific name: Culicoides impunctatus; Scots: Midgie; Scottish Gaelic: Meanbh-chuileag) is a species of small flying insect, found across the Palearctic (throughout the British Isles, Scandinavia, other regions of Northern Europe, Russia and Northern China) in upland and lowland areas (fens, bogs and marshes).

In the north west of Scotland and northern Wales the highland Class: Insecta. Philippine Zoological Expedition The Philippine Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Delfinado, Mercedes D. Culicoides midges have been reported as vecto rs of protozoan blood parasit es from parakeets in ailand (Miltgen et al.

), monkeys in Java (E yles and W arren ). The Ceratopogonidae as a whole is a family of small nematocerous flies, 2–4 mm in length with a wingspan of usually less than 2 mm.

Although closely related to the non-biting midges, or Chironomidae, they are easily distinguished by the female’s biting mouthparts, their short fore legs and characteristic venation on their membranous wings. Culicoides is a genus of biting midges in the family are over species in the genus, which is divided into many subgenera.

Several species are known to be vectors of various diseases and parasites which can affect animals. Like Leptoconops, the genus has a long fossil record, with earliest known fossils being from the Burmese amber, around 99 million years : Insecta.

Biting midges are small blood-sucking flies, so small that they are also called no-see-ums. The family Ceratopogonidae includes over 6, described species worldwide. The most important genus of biting midges of medical-veterinary interest is Culicoides. As a group they transmit a number of pathogens and parasites, including viruses, protozoans, and filarial by: Culicoides is the largest genus of the family Ceratopogonidae containing about species (Harrup et al.

Despite the veterinary importance of Culicoides biting midges the taxonomy of this genus is far from being resolved. Culicoides is divided into 31 subgenera, which represent 63% of. Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are among the smallest blood-sucking flies, with body lengths that rarely exceed three millimeters (Mellor et al., ).

The developmental cycle of Culicoides consists of egg, four larval instars, pupa and by: Wirth and Blanton () published “A review of the maruins or biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in the Amazon Basin”, the first consolidation of the Culicoides species from the Brazilian Amazon Region, with a description of 15 new species.

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) By Mercedes D Delfinado. Topics: Ceratopogonidae, Diptera, Philippine Zoological Expedition,Philippines Author: Mercedes D Delfinado.

The Philippine biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) By Mercedes D Delfinado. Philippine Zoological Expedition,Philippines. Publisher: [Chicago]Chicago Natural History Museum, Year: Author: Mercedes D Delfinado.

There are over 4, individual species of biting midge in the Ceratopogonidae family and over 1, species in the genus Culicoides and their distribution is world-wide! The larvae of no-see-ums require water, air, and food though they are neither strictly aquatic nor strictly terrestrial, but they cannot develop without moisture!Author: Steve Tapia.

Abstract. Six new species of biting midges of the genus Culicoides are described and figured: C. santanderi, C. caldasi, C.

pancensis, C. Pichindensis, C. pabloi, and C. male of C. florenciae is described for the first time and the female redescribed.

Specimens studied are from light-trap and/or biting collections taken in Valle and Cauca, : J. E. Browne. The type of midge that will bite humans belong to the genus Culicoides which is prevalent the world over. It is thought around 50 species are found in the UK with 37 of them in Scotland — unfortunately, that’s a lot of potential midge bites.